If it were, it might be such a turbulence (2017)   Project Description: Hauntings and Other Inclinations (February 2017)   How does one visualize black social life and death, particularly through abstraction? In the last while debates on the relationship to ontological blackness have ensued, in some ways between the notions of afro-pessimism (Wilderson 2010) and black optimism (Moten 2003). While afro-pessimism suggests there is not future for blackness, or the future for blackness, requires the destruction of the world as we know it, black optimism asks us to consider these illicit sites of impossible possibly as a positon with which to think the un-thought of blackness.  This series of images reflects on trace and residual embodiments that articulate themselves through abstract sculptural forms. I am interested in thinking of form and the photograph of the form, as matter, that collectively signify knowable objects/subjects/embodiment and simultaneously require scrutiny to make sense of what is possible. In this series of images, I explore, what Saidiya Hartman (1997) has called the haunting of the afterlife of slavery. Pigeon mesh—a material literally used to keep pigeons from nesting on patios—gives itself to the nature and shape of organic embodiment and resistance to such embodiment. I draw on the use of negative and positive space, depicted through black sculptural forms against white walls, to form a stark contrast.  I am interested in how formal elements of art, form, shape, and color, for example, still imagine perceptible troupes of race, anti-blackness, and darkness, to make visible notions of whiteness. Toni Morrison’s  Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination  (1990) anchors my inclination in this work. The multiple meaning, of the pigeon mesh, as an action to ward off, keep at bay and redact alongside is trace absence that always remains present or a silence that always speaks, become an imperative juxtaposition. Ultimately, this work creates pause with which to think about such a haunting of racial slavery in the contemporary moment.
       
     
 Redaction and the posit of space (2017)
       
     
 Suspension against a white wall (2017)
       
     
 At the corners of the impossible (2017)
       
     
 Untitled. (2017) Installation View. B&W Photographic Print, Projection, and Bird Netting.     This installation was produced during my time at the Feminist Art Conference Residency, in Toronto, Ontario, May 12-26th.  Untitled  (2017) uses three collective modalities—photographic print, bird netting, and projection—to contemplate the meanings of blackness, the violence of movement, and the ruse of perception. Each modality works in tandem to present an ongoing process of becoming through the cycles of deconstruction and reconstruction that are layered on top of each other. In  Untitled,  formal elements of art such as form, shape, and color, still imagine perceptible troupes of race, anti-blackness, and darkness, to make visible notions of whiteness. The broader works in this series,  Hauntings and Other Inclinations,  uses form and the photograph of these forms, as matter, that collectively signifies identifiable embodiments while simultaneously requiring a level of scrutiny to make sense of what is present.
       
     
 Untitled. Installation View. B&W Photographic Print, Projection, Bird Netting (2017)      
       
     
 Untitled. Installation VIew. Photographic Print, Projection, Bird Netting (2017)
       
     
 Untitled. Installation Detail. Photographic Print, Projection, Bird Netting (2017)
       
     
 Untitled. Installation Detail. Photographic Print, Projection, Bird Netting (2017)
       
     
 If it were, it might be such a turbulence (2017)   Project Description: Hauntings and Other Inclinations (February 2017)   How does one visualize black social life and death, particularly through abstraction? In the last while debates on the relationship to ontological blackness have ensued, in some ways between the notions of afro-pessimism (Wilderson 2010) and black optimism (Moten 2003). While afro-pessimism suggests there is not future for blackness, or the future for blackness, requires the destruction of the world as we know it, black optimism asks us to consider these illicit sites of impossible possibly as a positon with which to think the un-thought of blackness.  This series of images reflects on trace and residual embodiments that articulate themselves through abstract sculptural forms. I am interested in thinking of form and the photograph of the form, as matter, that collectively signify knowable objects/subjects/embodiment and simultaneously require scrutiny to make sense of what is possible. In this series of images, I explore, what Saidiya Hartman (1997) has called the haunting of the afterlife of slavery. Pigeon mesh—a material literally used to keep pigeons from nesting on patios—gives itself to the nature and shape of organic embodiment and resistance to such embodiment. I draw on the use of negative and positive space, depicted through black sculptural forms against white walls, to form a stark contrast.  I am interested in how formal elements of art, form, shape, and color, for example, still imagine perceptible troupes of race, anti-blackness, and darkness, to make visible notions of whiteness. Toni Morrison’s  Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination  (1990) anchors my inclination in this work. The multiple meaning, of the pigeon mesh, as an action to ward off, keep at bay and redact alongside is trace absence that always remains present or a silence that always speaks, become an imperative juxtaposition. Ultimately, this work creates pause with which to think about such a haunting of racial slavery in the contemporary moment.
       
     

If it were, it might be such a turbulence (2017)

Project Description: Hauntings and Other Inclinations (February 2017)

How does one visualize black social life and death, particularly through abstraction? In the last while debates on the relationship to ontological blackness have ensued, in some ways between the notions of afro-pessimism (Wilderson 2010) and black optimism (Moten 2003). While afro-pessimism suggests there is not future for blackness, or the future for blackness, requires the destruction of the world as we know it, black optimism asks us to consider these illicit sites of impossible possibly as a positon with which to think the un-thought of blackness.

This series of images reflects on trace and residual embodiments that articulate themselves through abstract sculptural forms. I am interested in thinking of form and the photograph of the form, as matter, that collectively signify knowable objects/subjects/embodiment and simultaneously require scrutiny to make sense of what is possible. In this series of images, I explore, what Saidiya Hartman (1997) has called the haunting of the afterlife of slavery. Pigeon mesh—a material literally used to keep pigeons from nesting on patios—gives itself to the nature and shape of organic embodiment and resistance to such embodiment. I draw on the use of negative and positive space, depicted through black sculptural forms against white walls, to form a stark contrast.

I am interested in how formal elements of art, form, shape, and color, for example, still imagine perceptible troupes of race, anti-blackness, and darkness, to make visible notions of whiteness. Toni Morrison’s Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination (1990) anchors my inclination in this work. The multiple meaning, of the pigeon mesh, as an action to ward off, keep at bay and redact alongside is trace absence that always remains present or a silence that always speaks, become an imperative juxtaposition. Ultimately, this work creates pause with which to think about such a haunting of racial slavery in the contemporary moment.

 Redaction and the posit of space (2017)
       
     

Redaction and the posit of space (2017)

 Suspension against a white wall (2017)
       
     

Suspension against a white wall (2017)

 At the corners of the impossible (2017)
       
     

At the corners of the impossible (2017)

 Untitled. (2017) Installation View. B&W Photographic Print, Projection, and Bird Netting.     This installation was produced during my time at the Feminist Art Conference Residency, in Toronto, Ontario, May 12-26th.  Untitled  (2017) uses three collective modalities—photographic print, bird netting, and projection—to contemplate the meanings of blackness, the violence of movement, and the ruse of perception. Each modality works in tandem to present an ongoing process of becoming through the cycles of deconstruction and reconstruction that are layered on top of each other. In  Untitled,  formal elements of art such as form, shape, and color, still imagine perceptible troupes of race, anti-blackness, and darkness, to make visible notions of whiteness. The broader works in this series,  Hauntings and Other Inclinations,  uses form and the photograph of these forms, as matter, that collectively signifies identifiable embodiments while simultaneously requiring a level of scrutiny to make sense of what is present.
       
     

Untitled. (2017) Installation View. B&W Photographic Print, Projection, and Bird Netting.

 

This installation was produced during my time at the Feminist Art Conference Residency, in Toronto, Ontario, May 12-26th. Untitled (2017) uses three collective modalities—photographic print, bird netting, and projection—to contemplate the meanings of blackness, the violence of movement, and the ruse of perception. Each modality works in tandem to present an ongoing process of becoming through the cycles of deconstruction and reconstruction that are layered on top of each other. In Untitled, formal elements of art such as form, shape, and color, still imagine perceptible troupes of race, anti-blackness, and darkness, to make visible notions of whiteness. The broader works in this series, Hauntings and Other Inclinations, uses form and the photograph of these forms, as matter, that collectively signifies identifiable embodiments while simultaneously requiring a level of scrutiny to make sense of what is present.

 Untitled. Installation View. B&W Photographic Print, Projection, Bird Netting (2017)      
       
     

Untitled. Installation View. B&W Photographic Print, Projection, Bird Netting (2017)

 

 

 Untitled. Installation VIew. Photographic Print, Projection, Bird Netting (2017)
       
     

Untitled. Installation VIew. Photographic Print, Projection, Bird Netting (2017)

 Untitled. Installation Detail. Photographic Print, Projection, Bird Netting (2017)
       
     

Untitled. Installation Detail. Photographic Print, Projection, Bird Netting (2017)

 Untitled. Installation Detail. Photographic Print, Projection, Bird Netting (2017)
       
     

Untitled. Installation Detail. Photographic Print, Projection, Bird Netting (2017)