Carte-de-viste, Sojourner Truth. 

Carte-de-viste, Sojourner Truth. 

Aesthetics Deception in Selling the Shadow (2016)

The carte-de-visite is perhaps the truest historical record we have that Sojourner Truth left behind. The carte-de-visite assisted in making portraits less expensive and reproducible. Through the use of this new technology, Nell Irvin Painter notes, “Truth established what few nineteenth-century black women were able to prove: that she was present in her time. Her success in distributing her portraits plays no small role in her place in historical memory.” While appearing unmediated these photographs were strategically and carefully staged. Juxtaposing the careful staging of these cartes-de-visite with Truth’s publicized oratory practice and a speech in Akron, Ohio on May 29, 1851—widely known as Ar’n't I a Woman—is to negotiate the terms of aesthetic deception. This article meditates on the burden of the real and the fictive as it becomes capable of producing aesthetic modes of suspension.

 
Composite Fields, installation still, 2015, Photograph by Toni Hafkensheid, Courtesy of artists and Doris McCarthy Gallery.

Composite Fields, installation still, 2015, Photograph by Toni Hafkensheid, Courtesy of artists and Doris McCarthy Gallery.

Composite Fields (2015) on ‘Nothingness’ and Mu 

Disparate parts form a constellation of three.

Third, is a means to an end and surrounds my life as a runner. Running as experience notes a collection of cathartic rituals, if you will, that leave me contemplating the sensibilities of my own abilities, pains and triumphs. Second, is a three channel video installation, entitled Composite Fields (2015), a collaborative between taisha paggett and Yann Novak on view at the Doris McCarthy Gallery at the University of Toronto, Scarborough. Based on a performance at the Mackey Garage, MAK Center for Art and Architecture in 2012, Composite Fields considers the way in which the body in modern and experimental dance might mold itself and responds to/against social and political realities.[1] The work sits amidst a broader exhibition titled Temperamental curated by Erin Silver that engages first, 'direct parallels between old and new to consider the ways in which contemporary art might be organized in relation to resistance to formal, social and political strategies of the post-war avant-garde' and second, temperamental functions as a euphemism for homosexual.[2] First, then marking a beginning, are some provocations by cultural theorist and poet Fred Moten.